‘It’s a nice problem to have’ just another way for companies to avoid admitting they’ve f***ed up

A company which recently expanded its operations by opening 3 new branches across the UK, has seen turnover increase dramatically, but has no infrastructure to support it.  Impatient customers have been calling the Customer Service department at Head Office to complain about delayed orders and staff powerless to do anything about it.

Managing Director Joel Sweeney explains.  “It didn’t occur to us that having 3 new sales outlets would result in a huge increase in sales orders, so we didn’t purchase more stock to cover them.  As a result we’re trending on social media.  Someone on Twitter called us a bunch of money-grabbing capitalist wank-badgers. But it’s a nice problem to have.”

Customer Services team leader Rupert disagrees.  “It’s not a nice problem to have.  It’s a frigging nightmare, trying to sort out the shit that’s going down.  We’ve taken more orders than ever and no hope of delivering within our stated time-frame.”

Shareholders are reported to be ‘over the moon’ with the profit forecast and have advised staff to concentrate on managing customers’ expectations instead of moaning about being incredibly stressed.

Not enough enormous skyscrapers in London so we’re going to build some more, confirm property moguls

“St. Paul’s Cathedral is in the bloody way of my next architectural masterpiece, so I’ve applied for permission to knock it down.”  So says architect Sir Malcolm Hempell-Chalke, the award-winning maverick behind such London landmarks as The Spike, The Shoebox, and The Penguin.  Plans for The Lipstick, as it will affectionately be known, will be located at 1 Paternoster Row.

The dearth of prime real estate for foreign businesses in London is problematic, according to experts.  Fancy offices full of bespoke leather banquettes, Nespresso machines and unfeasibly tall indoor palms are running desperately scarce.  The Shard, The Cheese Grater and The Walkie-Talkie have only temporarily alleviated the problem.  Sir Malcolm has been approached once again, to draw up plans for yet another tallest building in the world; even taller than the one that was the tallest building in the world last week.

“It’s looking promising”, smiles Sir Malcolm, lighting a Montecristo No. 9 and wafting the match out.  “The permission shouldn’t be too difficult to obtain, enough money has changed hands for it to be a mere formality.  I know it seems a shame to bulldoze one of the most famous cathedrals in the world, but there are fintech firms out there begging for offices in a really tall structure.  Foreign tourists will just have to find something else to photograph.”

Initial plans to include an allocation of affordable apartments on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd floors had to be shelved, after tears of laughter from prospective foreign investors turned the cardboard scale model to mush.

Labour’s policy on Europe still as accessible as unicorn ambergris

Jeremy Corbyn has today continued to promote Labour’s EU election campaign in Medway, Kent.  With the date of the European elections fast approaching, and with Labour’s position on the EU still obscure, calls to provide voters with a frank mission statement have prompted a stirring of action at party HQ.

Faced with continued confusion amongst ordinary voters as to what precisely Labour’s policy on the EU is, Mr Corbyn sought to clarify the party’s position once and for all, using the quintessential political tool of the tortuous analogy.  This morning Mr Corbyn took ‘prole-splaining’ to a new level in front of a 500-strong crowd.

“Look, we know our country is very much divided between those who like BigMacs and those who prefer Filets-o-Fish.  The vast majority of Labour supporters like BigMacs, but a minority like Filets-o-Fish better, and there have been growing calls from both camps to just let everyone have a choice over whether they want to order a BigMac or a Filet-o-Fish.

So that is why Labour’s number one priority is, and always has been, to replace McDonald’s with Burger King, so that we can provide people with better sandwiches of all kinds, as well as chicken nuggets. However, it looks unlikely that we’ll be able to replace McDonald’s with Burger King. Therefore we will commit to securing the very best Filet-o-Fish possible, which will mean negotiating with McDonald’s to change the recipe, because the current Filet-o-Fish is rubbish.”

As rapturous applause rang out around the town square, partly from people in agreement with the Labour leader’s pledge to instigate bold change against a backdrop of economic turmoil, but largely from those who have grown frustrated with the lack of choice of greasy fast food, Mr Corbyn continued with his theme.

“And if – and it is a big if – we cannot improve the Filet-o-Fish, nor can we replace Maccy D’s with BK, then we support keeping all options on the table.  And all options would, by definition, theoretically include the option to just let people decide for themselves whether they want to order a BigMac or a Filet-o-Fish.”

Mr Corbyn refused to be drawn on whether he is, himself, in favour of fish burgers or beef burgers.

Splitting a restaurant bill most stressful life event after moving house and getting divorced

A new study to be published next month has revealed that the stress levels produced by divvying up a restaurant bill between a large group of people is on a par with moving house or getting divorced.

The University of Tewkesbury questioned 12,000 people in the largest ever study of its kind.  Early results suggest that as splitting a bill is usually done at the end of the night, after everyone has had several drinks and is desperate not to miss the last train home, the situation can spiral disastrously out of control.

University spokesman Dr Julian Smith says that problems can occur when someone announces “I’m not drinking much tonight, I’ve got an early start tomorrow”, and then insists on working out the price of two thirds of a glass of wine.  “Then someone always orders a main course that is way more expensive than everyone else’s, and no one can quite agree how much of a tip to leave.  Things get worse when the waiter inevitably adds an extra gin and tonic in the hope that they’ll all be too pissed to notice.”

One survey respondent commented, “My wife and I had just moved into a new house so that we could live closer to her family.  To celebrate, I organised a big family dinner with 8 of her relatives, but splitting the bill between that bunch of pissheads caused so much aggro that we’re now getting divorced. Fuck my life.”

London couple on holiday in Cotswolds ‘bored shitless’ after 24 hours

30-something couple Sunny and Neema Shah, from Dalston, can’t wait to get back to the safe and warm embrace of East London.  The reason for their homesick pining?  They’ve stupidly gone on a week’s holiday to Gloucestershire and are deeply regretting the decision.

“We thought a spell of pastoral relaxation would be really nice, but instead we’re so bored we’ve started playing ‘I spy with my little eye’, the answers to which are a bit predictable when you’re in a field”, complains Sunny.  “The English countryside is overrated. It’s full of horse shit, pollen and racists.  There isn’t even a Boxpark out here.  We’ve just spent 2 hours in Bibury staring at a row of cottages that look barely habitable.  We’re doing falconry tomorrow, and all I can think is that my eyes might get pecked out, which will make me rubbish at ‘I Spy’.”

Neema is also unimpressed with the Cotswolds.  “Bourton is described in the guidebooks as pretty and quaint, but when you’re being kettled up the High Street in a huddle of 200 American tourists at the pace of an elderly tortoise in a fucking Ikea, it takes the shine off.  On the other hand, we got hammered last night, on a really decent Chianti that only cost 12 quid down the local pub.  Get in.”

Restoration contractors advised to stop setting fire to historical monuments

Restoration contractors who are tasked with restoring and preserving Europe’s greatest monuments are being strongly advised to try and avoid burning them to the ground, it has emerged.  Since the devastating fire that tore through Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral on Monday, it has been suggested that destroying historically important buildings should probably been avoided.

In a damning report into the fire, which hasn’t been commissioned yet but presumably will, a number of recommendations aimed at reducing the likelihood of further fires will be made.  These include turning off electrical appliances when workers pack up for the night, not having a crafty fag and lobbing the dog-end into things made of wood or fabric, and removing priceless combustible artifacts before setting up high-voltage power tools next to them.

A site foreman who wishes to remain anonymous, and who has worked on a number of prestigious  restoration projects over the past few years, has welcomed the as-yet not commissioned report.  “It’s not easy trying to remember all the safety stuff on site.  So to be reminded of things like not leaving the welding torches on when we go for our tea break, or not plugging in the curling tongs next to the rood screen, is actually quite useful.  For example, centuries-old timbers are quite likely to catch fire when you have an indoor barbecue next to them.  Who knew?”

The following buildings have, within the last few decades, also been engulfed in flames after someone forgot they were supposed to not destroy them:

The Cutty Sark
Glasgow School of Art (twice, for crying out loud)
Clandon Park
Windsor Castle
York Minster
The entire City of London, when a Pudding Lane resident left a chip pan on

All monuments will be fully repaired at great expense by interested philanthropist millionaires.  The NHS will continue to be chronically under-funded.

 

.

%d bloggers like this: